Browse Prior Art Database

Remote Ipl Support Via Personal System/2 Parallel Port

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037206D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Edrington: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article allows a Personal System/2 (PS/2) system to remote program load (RPL) test cases or any application program via the PS/2 parallel port by making modifications to the system BIOS. This provides an inexpensive way to load programs into the PS/2 system when it is turned on from a server system with supporting software. It also provides the capability for the results of the test to be collected on the server system.

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Remote Ipl Support Via Personal System/2 Parallel Port

This article allows a Personal System/2 (PS/2) system to remote program load (RPL) test cases or any application program via the PS/2 parallel port by making modifications to the system BIOS. This provides an inexpensive way to load programs into the PS/2 system when it is turned on from a server system with supporting software. It also provides the capability for the results of the test to be collected on the server system.

The BIOS is modified so that when a special parallel RPL flag is set, logical diskette requests via BIOS INT 13H are converted into request records that are sent out to the server via the parallel port. When the server receives the request, it fetches the data from the server system and builds an acknowledge record that contains the data and sends it back to the requester. The requester then receives the data via the parallel port and completes the INT 13H request from the application program.

This BIOS modification supports the manufacturing boot request by extending the capabilities to load DOS and a variety of application test programs. When the manufacturing tester places a scan code of 65 hex into the keyboard input, this sets the special parallel RPL flag and allows the boot process via the diskette to be redirected over the parallel port to the manufacturing tester or server.

The system BIOS is modified by the following algorithm:
1. If a hex 65 is received, then set the special parallel

RPL Flag.
2. After POST completes successfully, it will attempt

to boot the system.
3. If the parallel RPL flag is set, then continue and

attempt to boot via diskette. Diskette requests from POST

will get redirected to the server system. The application

then has control of the system.
4. Else attempt to boot of the diskette drive. If the

diskette boot is successful, then the application

has control of the system.
5. Else check to see...