Browse Prior Art Database

Universal Cable System for RS-232 Serial Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037207D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hatcher, SC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a means by which any RS-232 serial device may attach to a host device using a common physical cable and a unique interposer placed at the non-host end of the cable simplifying system cabling (all cables are the same) and easing change procedures (different devices may require a change of interposer -- much cheaper and easier than changing existing cabling). Similarly, only one "gender" of cable is required in that the interposer can easily have the appropriate gender or could even provide both.

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Universal Cable System for RS-232 Serial Devices

Disclosed is a means by which any RS-232 serial device may attach to a host device using a common physical cable and a unique interposer placed at the non-host end of the cable simplifying system cabling (all cables are the same) and easing change procedures (different devices may require a change of interposer -- much cheaper and easier than changing existing cabling). Similarly, only one "gender" of cable is required in that the interposer can easily have the appropriate gender or could even provide both.

The most common form of RS-232 interface implements five control signals, Transmit Data, Receive Data, and Signal Ground. Most devices that may be attached via an RS-232 interface other than modems implement a subset of these five control lines by connecting two or more of them together. For example, the figure illustrates two of these schemes used when attaching common devices. Usually, the "wrapping" of assorted control signals is accomplished in a unique cable. If a user has a serial printer attached to a host and suddenly needs to attach a terminal in its place, the host has very little problem reconfiguring, but the user must typically exchange the entire cable because the wrapping schemes are incompatible.

The solution described here is to use a single cable of appropriate length implementing all seven signals, signal ground, and shield, this being itself useful without an interposer, being a typical modem...