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Electrical-Lead Straightener Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037224D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hanson, BB: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Automated tools for inserting Single Inline Packages (SIPs) are known and have a subassembly known as a straightener. A lead straightener die in the assembly (refer to the figure) precisely aligns the part prior to pick up by the insertion head. The die was originally made out of tool steel and later carbide backed by steel.

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Electrical-Lead Straightener Process

Automated tools for inserting Single Inline Packages (SIPs) are known and have a subassembly known as a straightener. A lead straightener die in the assembly (refer to the figure) precisely aligns the part prior to pick up by the insertion head. The die was originally made out of tool steel and later carbide backed by steel.

Component test systems have been developed as an option for the SIP inserter. The tester uses the straightener die as a test point. Probes are mounted in the back of the die and contact the leads of the die to test the value of the SIP. The SIP is checked for correct part number, correct orientation and for any bent leads prior to insertion in the Circuit Board. Therefore, the die has to be made out of a nonconductive material (thus eliminating steel or carbide). Dies made of TORLON 4203*, a machined plastic part, are costly and any misalignment would cause the die to deteriorate at a much higher rate. This makes the use of the component tester uneconomical.

A method solving this problem involves several elements:

1) Development of a mold to produce the parts more

cheaply.

2) Selection of a moldable material that could best

handle the impacts of the process.

3) Location of the mounting block that the

straightener die is attached to, such that the

straightener die can be remounted to the same

position after a die change.

The selection of moldable materials is accomplished by molding 10 to 20 dies out of eac...