Browse Prior Art Database

Manual Substrate Edge Trimming Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037330D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 4 page(s) / 103K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barenboim, M: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

This article describes a technique of scoring laminates in the green sheet stage so that after baking, the edges can be snap trimmed using a manual substrate edge-trimming tool.

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Manual Substrate Edge Trimming Tool

This article describes a technique of scoring laminates in the green sheet stage so that after baking, the edges can be snap trimmed using a manual substrate edge-trimming tool.

Existing post-oven substrate manufacturing processes include sawing, sizing and sintering operations which are complicated and time consuming. In addition, tools are required of a high degree of accuracy to meet critical substrate outer dimensions. Due to the sawing and sizing operations, only 4 single substrates can be produced from a stack of laminates, because it requires a generous spacing between the single substrates as illustrated in Fig. 1.

If the laminates can be scored at the pre-oven stage ("green sheets" stage) and after the baking operation, they can be snapped clean along the scoring grooves. The number of single substrates produced from this stack of laminates, without changing its fixed outer dimensions "A", can be increased from 4 to 9, as shown in Fig. 2, which depicts a layout of a laminate stack with 9 adjacently spaced single substrates. The dotted line shows the pattern of 4 substrates. Chamfers "C" are part of the pattern which cannot be changed because it would require substantial change of the pre-oven laminate manufacturing tools. This particular pattern creates a problem of trimming the edges off the stack because the dimension "B" is a too narrow surface to manipulate.

The manual substrate edge trimming tool disclosed herein, shown in Figs. 3 and 4, overcomes the above-mentioned obstacles. It trims the

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edges not only straight, but also in such a clean manner that the substrates do not require any additional post processing (sizing, for example). This is accomplished by selecting a vertical slicing approach together with implementing the right combination of different materials (TEFLON*, nylon, carbide, etc.)

Fig. 3 shows the tool in its open position with laminate 1 (pattern of 9 substrates) resting between stopper 2, two roller-guides 3, and roller- compensator 4. All three rollers are spring-loaded in the vertical direction to allow clamping the laminates by top plate 8. Each of the rollers has a step to prevent scratching of the laminate's bottom surface while it is being loaded/unloaded into or out of the...