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Bar Code Photocopier and Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037335D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 3 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Denoix, B: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a photocopier equipped with a bar code reader. The photocopier can be instructed by a bar code on the paper to be copied. Functions such as reduction and contrast are coded for. Other uses which aid in the preparation of documents for distribution are discussed.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 45% of the total text.

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Bar Code Photocopier and Applications

Disclosed is a photocopier equipped with a bar code reader. The photocopier can be instructed by a bar code on the paper to be copied. Functions such as reduction and contrast are coded for. Other uses which aid in the preparation of documents for distribution are discussed.

One particular application of the bar code is to the distribution of copies. The bar code on the title page of a document will trigger RAM memory within the copier itself which contains stored distribution lists. The copier makes use of the code to automatically determine the person the copy is for, and also to determine how many copies to make. Each copy is provided with a cover page, generated by the copier, showing the addressee's name and whatever other information is pre-programmed into the copier's memory. A gummed sheet of pre-printed bar codes is placed at secretary locations, allowing them to simply affix the proper barcode label for a particular distribution. An ideal application situation would be where a memo is prepared at one geographic location for wide distribution at another geographic location. The single copy (rather than multiple copies) is sent, the bar code copier generating subsequent copies at the destination. The distribution lists will be stored on a 3.5-inch floppy disk. The copier's format will be identical to a PC's disk write format. The secretary prepares/edits the distribution list(s) on a PC, off-line. When complete, he/she removes the diskette from the PC and inserts it into the copier. In offices where there is no PC, an optional CRT or LCD input device accesses the diskette.

Another application of the bar code is the programming of the photocopier. Microcode 'fixes' to the internal copier program will be distributed as a simple sheet of paper filled with bar code rendition of the code. For small fixes, this would be tremendously more economical than floppy disk distribution. Diagnostic routines are also encoded on the same page as test patterns.

A third application of the bar code is for security. By placing a bar code at strategic places on the paper, the copier recognizes it and rejects the copy request (IBM Confidential Restricted, for instance). The modulo check bit (discussed below) prevents somebody from putting some white on the bar code itself. Of course, this is just a deterrent since an entire new bar code from one document can be placed on another. The use of multiple codes and placements may discourage this.

Not only can the bar code photocopier read bar codes, but it can generate them as directed by the user of the machine. The bar code can be placed on the copy if the original document contains no code. The code can also be substituted for the original -- useful for declassification of documents, distribution lists, etc. This is achieved most easily if there is a reserved space at the edge of the document so that the new code can "cover" the old during the process of reprod...