Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Thermally Enhanced Printed Circuit for Natural Convection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037427D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Appelt, BK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A typical printed circuit has a capability for power dissipation through the electrical circuit itself, and heat that is transferred to the back surface. The heat transfer can be enhanced only by adding heatsinks on either side of the circuit board. Consequently, thickness and volume requirements of the assembly increase.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Thermally Enhanced Printed Circuit for Natural Convection

A typical printed circuit has a capability for power dissipation through the electrical circuit itself, and heat that is transferred to the back surface. The heat transfer can be enhanced only by adding heatsinks on either side of the circuit board. Consequently, thickness and volume requirements of the assembly increase.

Here, a cost effective methodology is described to build a heatsink integral to the board without increasing its inherent thickness. This is accomplished by providing grooves in the backside surface. This serves to increase the active surface area, and to channel the air in a convection environment in order to improve cooling (e.g., straight 10 mil channels on 20 mil centers at a depth of 10 mils doubles the surface area). The geometry can be optimized for the particular application to increase the surface area further. If channeled flow is of higher importance than radiative surfaces, then the spacing and depth can be optimized accordingly to enhance laminar flow.

This package can be enhanced further by etching lines on the topside to channel air for convective cooling. These lines should preferentially be located at the perimeter and can be electrically inactive if appropriate. All lines or grooves need to be aligned with the airflow for maximum effectiveness.

Disclosed anonymously.

1