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Magnetic Recording Head With Squeeze Bearing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037441D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gunn, JB: AUTHOR

Abstract

An ultrasonic transducer is incorporated in the slider of a magnetic recording head for a disk file. The transducer is operative to vibrate the slider to generate a squeeze bearing to lift and lower the head during start/stop.

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Magnetic Recording Head With Squeeze Bearing

An ultrasonic transducer is incorporated in the slider of a magnetic recording head for a disk file. The transducer is operative to vibrate the slider to generate a squeeze bearing to lift and lower the head during start/stop.

There is a problem with high density disk files caused by abrasive damage to the disk surface during start-up. The cause is that, while the disk is accelerating from rest, the read-write head is in sliding contact with it for a short time before the air bearing builds up a safe clearance of a few microinches between the slider and the disk surface. Lubricants are traditionally incorporated in the magnetic recording medium to eliminate this damage, but they are becoming ineffective as flying heights are reduced to achieve higher recording densities. Also, lubricants introduce some problems of their own; they can migrate to the interface between the head and the medium when the disk is stationary for a long period, causing the two to stick together, and destroying the head suspension when the file is next started up.

In order to overcome these difficulties, it is proposed to incorporate an ultrasonic transducer in the slider of the head, so that it can be made to vibrate in one of its flexural modes. In this way, a squeeze air bearing can be formed between the slider and the medium, independently of the rotation of the disk. Thus, before the disk started to rotate, the head could be raised on this...