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Preparation of Superconducting Thin Films by Spray Deposition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037443D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gupta, A: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Since the discovery of superconductivity at high temperatures in a class of materials containing copper oxide, the deposition of thin films of these materials which are superconducting has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Films which are typically 1 micron thick have been deposited by vacuum evaporation of the metals in presence of oxygen, magnetron and ion beam sputtering from a composite or dual targets, and by laser evaporation from a superconducting target. The deposited films have to be annealed under proper conditions to produce the superconducting phase. Thicker films (10-25 microns) have been deposited by plasma spraying a powder of the superconducting material followed by annealing.

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Preparation of Superconducting Thin Films by Spray Deposition

Since the discovery of superconductivity at high temperatures in a class of materials containing copper oxide, the deposition of thin films of these materials which are superconducting has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Films which are typically 1 micron thick have been deposited by vacuum evaporation of the metals in presence of oxygen, magnetron and ion beam sputtering from a composite or dual targets, and by laser evaporation from a superconducting target. The deposited films have to be annealed under proper conditions to produce the superconducting phase. Thicker films (10-25 microns) have been deposited by plasma spraying a powder of the superconducting material followed by annealing. While the vacuum techniques can deposit films which are thin and uniform, the process is quite slow and requires expensive equipment. The presence of a number of variable parameters also makes it difficult to have accurate and reproducible control over the stoichiometry, which is crucial for obtaining high Tc films. A simple and inexpensive process for producing superconducting films can employ spraying and decomposing a film prepared from inorganic precursors. The process allows accurate control of the stoichiometry and produces films with very reproducible properties.

Films of Y1Ba2Cu307-w have been prepared using the following procedure: A mixed nitrate powder (Yttrium, Barium and Copper) is prepared by mixing stoichiometric amounts of yttrium oxide, barium carbonate and copper oxide (Y:Ba:Cu ratio of 1:2:3) with nitric acid and then evaporati...