Browse Prior Art Database

Capturing Video Signals for Computer Usage

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037452D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bennett, WE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby a device captures video images at a periodic rate, so as to feed the data into a computer for program implementation.

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Capturing Video Signals for Computer Usage

A technique is described whereby a device captures video images at a periodic rate, so as to feed the data into a computer for program implementation.

Typically, useful information is displayed through video cable subscriptions, such as stock market quotations, weather reports, etc. Devices are available, as an extra cost item for attachment to a computer, so that data can be directed for computer usage. Such devices typically attach to a proprietary television or radio channel or direct wire available on a subscription fee basis. The concept described herein differs in that it provides a means of capturing the video data, with a low- cost personal computer add-on device, directly from the non- proprietary television signal. This avoids (legitimately) the subscription fee channel.

The device used is generically referred to as a "frame grabber". It is designed to capture the picture from a running video signal, digitize it, and provide digitized information for processing by a computer system. The details of the "frame grabber" are not described here, as such devices are widely known. However, the implementation of this concept may use a "frame grabber" that is less sophisticated and less costly than many devices available.

The concept concentrates on utilizing only a small slice of the bottom of the frame, as is typically used to display stock quotations. The resolution requirements are moderate, both spatially and in in...