Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Single Code Stream Tests Two Microprocessors With Common Logic

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037498D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bergey, AL, Jr: AUTHOR

Abstract

Testing logic that interacts with two different microprocessors can be tricky. The obvious way to do it is to write two programs, one for each microprocessor, that interact. However, synchronizing the two code streams and ensuring that both microprocessors are doing the right thing at the right time is not easy. In addition, if the two microprocessors use different instruction sets and different development teams, microcode cooperation becomes even more difficult.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 69% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Single Code Stream Tests Two Microprocessors With Common Logic

Testing logic that interacts with two different microprocessors can be tricky. The obvious way to do it is to write two programs, one for each microprocessor, that interact. However, synchronizing the two code streams and ensuring that both microprocessors are doing the right thing at the right time is not easy. In addition, if the two microprocessors use different instruction sets and different development teams, microcode cooperation becomes even more difficult.

This invention is a mechanism that simplifies this coordination problem and makes it much more manageable.

The invention requires two microprocessors, common logic to be tested, and a communication channel between the two microprocessors. Although the coupling between the microprocessors can be either tight or loose, test execution time is minimized by a system that communicates many short messages quickly.

One of the microprocessors is the master, and the other microprocessor is the slave. The master runs the test program. This test program contains all the "intelligence" of the test for both microprocessors. The test program manipulates registers and other facilities of both microprocessors as if they were all attached directly to the master microprocessor. Manipulations of the master's facility call subroutines that manipulate these local facilities directly. Manipulations of the slave facility call subroutines that communicate with the s...