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An Inductive Thin Film Write Head Structure

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037501D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Friedman, JD: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

When forming inductive thin film heads, it is desirable to obtain as thin a head as possible while at the same time ensuring adequate insulation between the conductive elements of the head. These objectives can best be achieved if the topography of the head structure remains substantially planar.

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An Inductive Thin Film Write Head Structure

When forming inductive thin film heads, it is desirable to obtain as thin a head as possible while at the same time ensuring adequate insulation between the conductive elements of the head. These objectives can best be achieved if the topography of the head structure remains substantially planar.

The figure shows a cross-sectional view of a thin film head structure when formed on a magnetic substrate. An electrically conductive film such as a gold or copper is formed over the substrate and then patterned using photolithographic techniques to form the conductive coils 1. A cross-linked photoresist layer 2 is then formed over the conductive coils 1. The photoresist layer 2 provides an insulating layer between the coils 1 and a subsequently deposited magnetic closure layer.

An aluminum oxide layer 3 is then deposited onto the substrate and photoresist layer 2. The aluminum oxide is removed from the back gap area 4. The oxide layer 3 serves as a mill or etch stop material during subsequent removal of the magnetic nickel-iron closure material. A layer 5 of nickel-iron is deposited over the surface of the substrate. The nickel-iron is then removed from all areas of the head except the closure area shown by layer 5 by a process of etching or milling. As the oxide layer 3 mills or etches much more slowly than the nickel- iron, it provides protection to the other layers during the etching or milling operation.

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