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Oxygen Content Control in Superconducting Oxides

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037577D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Giess, EA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Oxygen content in the form of concentrations of oxygen species or formal copper (III) species in high transition temperature superconducting oxides of the perovskite type of structure can be varied in a solid state cell containing an oxide ion-conducting electrolyte.

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Oxygen Content Control in Superconducting Oxides

Oxygen content in the form of concentrations of oxygen species or formal copper (III) species in high transition temperature superconducting oxides of the perovskite type of structure can be varied in a solid state cell containing an oxide ion-conducting electrolyte.

In the figure, superconducting oxide electrode 1, such as barium yttrium copper oxide, in the form of a crystal, ceramic pellet or thin film, is placed in intimate control at one surface with electrolyte 2, which is a stabilized yttria zinconia exhibiting transport numbers greater than 0.99 for oxygen ions or vacancies. A suitable oxygen catalyst 3, i.e., platinum, gold, silver or other perovskite oxide catalyst, is placed in contact with the other side of the electrolyte
2. Electrical contact is made to the back of superconducting oxide electrode 1 by inert gauze 4, such as platinum, gold or silver. Quartz chamber 5 is sealed by top 6 and o-ring 7 and the electrode assembly is held compressed by spring 8 acting on quartz rod 9 in chamber 5. Oxygen is supplied to the chamber and an electric current is passed through the cell via lead 10 (e.g., gold, silver) catalyst 3, electrolyte 2, oxide 1 and gauze 4 and gold lead 11.

The oxygen content of superconducting oxide or the concentration of formal copper (III) species can be varied as desired with a current driven by an appropriate potential applied across the cell.

Disclosed anonymously.

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