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Single Step Pattern Transfer to Superconducting Oxides and Resist Removal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037629D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Koch, R: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Figure 1 shows a superconducting oxide (for example, (YBa2Cu3Ox) with a layer of organic resist patterned on top. The carbonaceous resist has a very low sputtering rate and serves as an etch mask when the structure is ion milled with, for example, argon ions. The superconducting oxide has a much higher sputtering rate (comparable to Au) and the uncovered material is removed much faster than the resist etch mask. Oxygen released by the milling of the superconducting oxide reacts with the carbon in the resist and removes the resist via an ashing process, shown in Figure 2. The resist thickness is chosen so that the resist is removed by ashing just prior to completely milling through the uncovered superconducting oxide, leaving a clean surface for further processing.

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Single Step Pattern Transfer to Superconducting Oxides and Resist Removal

Figure 1 shows a superconducting oxide (for example, (YBa2Cu3Ox) with a layer of organic resist patterned on top. The carbonaceous resist has a very low sputtering rate and serves as an etch mask when the structure is ion milled with, for example, argon ions. The superconducting oxide has a much higher sputtering rate (comparable to Au) and the uncovered material is removed much faster than the resist etch mask. Oxygen released by the milling of the superconducting oxide reacts with the carbon in the resist and removes the resist via an ashing process, shown in Figure 2. The resist thickness is chosen so that the resist is removed by ashing just prior to completely milling through the uncovered superconducting oxide, leaving a clean surface for further processing.

Placing a thin layer of an inorganic material (such as W) with an intermediate sputtering rate between the superconducting oxide and the organic resist is desirable if the resist pattern must be transferred exactly into the superconducting oxide. The sandwiched layer serves to protect the underlying superconducting oxide from the ion milling after the resist is ashed away.

This process accomplishes in a single step what a conventional patterning/ashing process requires two steps to complete.

Disclosed anonymously.

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