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Vortex Storage in High Tc Superconductors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037630D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chaudhari, P: AUTHOR

Abstract

High Tc oxide superconductors can be used for storing information using superconducting vortex lines. A thin film of superconductor is deposited on a substrate and using either patterned substrate or photo-resist technology, the superconducting film is inscribed with normal 10 and superconducting 12 regions (Fig. 1). The normal state can be defined either by the absence of the superconducting material (a hole) or alternatively can be thin superconducting material that has been changed to a normal material by, e.g., ion implantation. Information is stored by writing in by a heat pulse and bias magnetic field. The heat pulse can be applied with a laser pulse. The superconducting material is heated through its superconducting transition temperature in a magnetic field.

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Vortex Storage in High Tc Superconductors

High Tc oxide superconductors can be used for storing information using superconducting vortex lines. A thin film of superconductor is deposited on a substrate and using either patterned substrate or photo-resist technology, the superconducting film is inscribed with normal 10 and superconducting 12 regions (Fig. 1). The normal state can be defined either by the absence of the superconducting material (a hole) or alternatively can be thin superconducting material that has been changed to a normal material by, e.g., ion implantation. Information is stored by writing in by a heat pulse and bias magnetic field. The heat pulse can be applied with a laser pulse. The superconducting material is heated through its superconducting transition temperature in a magnetic field. When it cools it will generate superconducting currents 14 which will trap a vortex 16 (Fig. 2). The superconducting currents are generated around the normal region as shown in the attached drawing. Information is erased by heating the material in the absence of a magnetic field. Information written into the superconducting material will stay as long as the persistent currents can flow. It is also possible by controlling the magnetic fields to store multiple information in the same spot. This arises from the fact that the magnetic field is quantized and the number of vortices will be an integer number. Different states of information correspond to well- define...