Browse Prior Art Database

Bus Bar With Spring Contact for Blind Mounting

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037689D
Original Publication Date: 1989-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Evans, RT: AUTHOR

Abstract

A bus bar has spring members at one or both ends and is arranged to form a bridge between two stationary bus parts. The bus bar is held in position by the force of the springs, and it can be snapped into position in locations where one or both ends of the bar would be inaccessible to attachment tools.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 81% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Bus Bar With Spring Contact for Blind Mounting

A bus bar has spring members at one or both ends and is arranged to form a bridge between two stationary bus parts. The bus bar is held in position by the force of the springs, and it can be snapped into position in locations where one or both ends of the bar would be inaccessible to attachment tools.

An improved spring is formed from an initially flat square sheet of electrically conductive spring material. The sheet is punched or otherwise formed to have a center hole and 24 (e.g.) slits radiating from the center hole to form fingers that are each in the shape of an isosceles triangle that is attached to the sheet at its base and is free at its apex. The corners of the square sheet have holes for screwing or riveting the sheet to the outer face of the bus bar.

The triangles are bent outward at the base and the tips are bent inward so that contact occurs along the line of the inward bend. As the bus bar is positioned between the two stationary conductor parts, the fingers are deflected inwardly and thereby form a wiping contact with the face of a stationary bus part.

The tips of the triangles can be arranged to contact the underlying face of the bus bar after a predetermined deflection so that the fingers are supported at both ends and thereby provide increased spring force.

The fingers form multiple current carriers with multiple contact points. They are arranged to provide a high contact force, and the structure p...