Browse Prior Art Database

Circuit Module with Heat Transfer from Chip to Cooling Structure Through Piston Containing Water and Tilted at an Angle to Promote Defined Circulation for Vapor and Condensate

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037692D
Original Publication Date: 1989-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chu, RC: AUTHOR

Abstract

In some circuit modules, chips are supported in an array on a thin flat substrate and metal pistons contact the outer surface of the chip to conduct heat from the chips to a cooling and supporting structure. In this module, the pistons are hollow and contain a suitable amount of water and air at a suitable low pressure to cause evaporation to occur at a selected temperature. Thus, heat transfer inside the piston occurs partly by convection and the piston can be made longer than a conventional solid piston (which is limited in length by its thermal conduction resistance) for improved heat transfer to the cooling and supporting structure.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 89% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Circuit Module with Heat Transfer from Chip to Cooling Structure Through Piston Containing Water and Tilted at an Angle to Promote Defined Circulation for Vapor and Condensate

In some circuit modules, chips are supported in an array on a thin flat substrate and metal pistons contact the outer surface of the chip to conduct heat from the chips to a cooling and supporting structure. In this module, the pistons are hollow and contain a suitable amount of water and air at a suitable low pressure to cause evaporation to occur at a selected temperature. Thus, heat transfer inside the piston occurs partly by convection and the piston can be made longer than a conventional solid piston (which is limited in length by its thermal conduction resistance) for improved heat transfer to the cooling and supporting structure.

The substrate and the chips are oriented in a vertical plane, as is conventional. The piston is mounted with its axis at an angle of e.g. 45 degrees to the plane of the chip, and the end of the piston is formed at this angle to contact the outer surface of the chip. Thus the piston has a short upper wall and a long lower wall, both in contact with the cooling and supporting structure. The piston contains enough water to immerse the vertical inside wall of the end that contacts the chip. Vapor rises from the water surface and condenses on the exposed inner walls. The vapor tends to rise along the upper inside wall and the condensate tends to fall along the in...