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Testing High Frequency Oscillators

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037762D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-30
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Keller, ED: AUTHOR

Abstract

High frequency oscillators running at from 10 MHZ to 100 MHZ are now becoming used in large scale integrated circuits. The testing of such oscillators presents a problem for conventional testers. The circuit disclosed herein provides a way to accomplish the testing of high frequency oscillators.

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Testing High Frequency Oscillators

High frequency oscillators running at from 10 MHZ to 100 MHZ are now becoming used in large scale integrated circuits. The testing of such oscillators presents a problem for conventional testers. The circuit disclosed herein provides a way to accomplish the testing of high frequency oscillators.

As is shown in Fig. 1, the output of the device under test which is to be tested for its frequency is applied to the input of the circuit invention. The invention consists of a rate- reduction counter having an input connected to the test terminal of the device under test. The counter will reduce the repetition rate for the frequency by a convenient factor of from 10 to 100. For example, if the device under test has an oscillator generating a frequency of 10 MHZ, a factor of 10 counter will reduce the count repetition rate to 1 MHZ. The output of the counter is then applied through a diode to a storage capacitor. The diode will admit pulses of only one polarity and the voltage of the single polarity pulses is then accumulated on the capacitor as a voltage level. Attached to the capacitor is a conventional voltage measuring device which, when connected across the capacitor, will measure a voltage which is proportional to the frequency of the oscillator on the device under test.

An alternate embodiment of the invention is shown in Fig. 2, wherein a frequency to voltage converter can be used in place of the diode and storage capacitor circu...