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Browse Prior Art Database

Laboratory Screen Vibrator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037789D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-30
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Coburn, GH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a tool that allows a test operator to recover all the steel shot or other similar material from laboratory test screens by gently dislodging material that is otherwise unrecovered. This increases the accuracy of tests because the recovered material is needed to determine whether the tested material meets specified acceptance test criteria.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 75% of the total text.

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Laboratory Screen Vibrator

This article describes a tool that allows a test operator to recover all the steel shot or other similar material from laboratory test screens by gently dislodging material that is otherwise unrecovered. This increases the accuracy of tests because the recovered material is needed to determine whether the tested material meets specified acceptance test criteria.

Laboratory screens have high precision meshes that are calibrated for accuracy. If subjected to deforming stresses, such as may be encountered when dislodging material caught in the screen, the expensive screen -- and sometimes an entire screen set -- must be replaced.

Steel shot used in processing developer for copiers and printers is specified to close tolerances. A predetermined amount of steel shot is poured through a series of laboratory screens, each having a given mesh size. The screens are weighed to determine the percentage of the steel shot that has remained on each screen. Depending on the specified criteria, a shipment of steel shot is accepted or rejected.

Since each steel shot sample contains material that falls between successive mesh sizes, some of the shot becomes lodged in the mesh. If these are not recovered, the test results will be inaccurate.

A common method of dislodging such material is to use a fine nylon brush. A coarser or harder brush will damage the mesh by distorting the holes in the screen to the point where the standards are no longer accurate. Th...