Browse Prior Art Database

Toner Jetmill Rotor Design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037791D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-30
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rose, L: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a high speed toner jetmill rotor design and mounting configuration that allows the grinding anvils to be replaced and balanced without the need of welding and/or removing material from the rotor circumference. The correct and precise balancing of the rotor is critical to the function of the jetmill which rotates at speeds in excess of 4,000 revolutions per minute. Incorrect balancing results in extremely high vibrations and eventually destroying the machinery.

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Toner Jetmill Rotor Design

Disclosed is a high speed toner jetmill rotor design and mounting configuration that allows the grinding anvils to be replaced and balanced without the need of welding and/or removing material from the rotor circumference. The correct and precise balancing of the rotor is critical to the function of the jetmill which rotates at speeds in excess of 4,000 revolutions per minute. Incorrect balancing results in extremely high vibrations and eventually destroying the machinery.

Fig. 1 illustrates the overall rotor mounting configuration that ensures the rotor location relative to the shafts locating shoulder is positive and vertical to the ground plane.

A belleville washer is used to apply continuous force to the rotor. Forces is generated by tightening a locknut against the washer partially collapsing it and inserting a cotter pin in the locknuts slot preventing it loosening up.

In Fig. 2, balancing of the rotor is achieved by positioning the anvils around the circumference of rotor in a location that the center of mass is correctly placed. Positioning is obtained by adjusting the lead screw into the rotor or backing it away from the rotor, which, in turn, moves the anvil towards the center of rotation or moves it away from the rotor circumference.

Disclosed anonymously.

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