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Print Knowledge Base Objects in Depth First Order

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037820D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-30
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Crehan, DT: AUTHOR

Abstract

A knowledge base (KB) is essentially a group of atomic knowledge objects such as rules, sources, frames, etc. Rules, for example, do not have an inherent order, other than their firing order, and that order will vary from one execution of the KB to the next. So, there is no natural static order. Consequently, the order for a printed listing of the contents of each object is somewhat difficult to define.

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Print Knowledge Base Objects in Depth First Order

A knowledge base (KB) is essentially a group of atomic knowledge objects such as rules, sources, frames, etc. Rules, for example, do not have an inherent order, other than their firing order, and that order will vary from one execution of the KB to the next. So, there is no natural static order. Consequently, the order for a printed listing of the contents of each object is somewhat difficult to define.

The concept of clustering rules in a tree-like structure can be imposed on these isolated entities. Given that such a structure is in place, the contents of a given cluster and its descendents can be printed in depth first order. For example, in the tree structure shown in the FIG., the print order for the cluster source would be: SOURCES PROCEDURES FUEL_CONSUMED QUESTIONS FUEL_QUESTIONS LAST_FILLUP OCTANE_RATING CHECK_TIRES COMMANDS DATABASES

This order will allow the user to quickly find an object in a printed listing by glancing at the tree graph to find the location. At the same time, it also keeps related objects together for easy comparison and working in one area. An alphabetical listing would not have this last feature. The user with an alphabetical listing may have to hunt all over the listing to make pen and ink notations on a cluster, for example, of 4 rules, when he really needs to see all four 'at once', i.e., closely positioned for rapid cross-reference.

Disclosed anonymously.

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