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ELECTRICALLY PLUGABLE HSA-TO-ACTUATOR CONFIGURATION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037837D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-30
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Glaser, TW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Three-dimensional printed circuits are used to provide electrically pluggable connections between read/write, head/suspension assemblies (HSA), and an actuator comb assembly in a hard disk drive application.

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ELECTRICALLY PLUGABLE HSA-TO-ACTUATOR CONFIGURATION

Three-dimensional printed circuits are used to provide electrically pluggable connections between read/write, head/suspension assemblies (HSA), and an actuator comb assembly in a hard disk drive application.

A rotary actuator comb assembly consisting of arms that are stacked and fastened together is depicted in the figure. As illustrated, three-dimensional printed circuit configurations are applied to each arm. Typically, single HSAs are fitted to the top and bottom arms of an actuator, and double, back-to-back HSAs are fitted to the inner arms. Consequently, printed circuit patterns are required only on the inner surfaces of the top and bottom arms, but on both surfaces of the inner arms.

Each HSA is fixed to a rectangular band for ease of attachment to its respective arm. To facilitate electrical connections between the HSAs and the comb assembly, flexible printed circuits are attached to the inner surfaces of the suspensions and extend into the rectangular band, as illustrated in view A of the figure. Head coil leads (not shown) are soldered or welded to each flex circuit in a conventional manner; however, electrical connections are made between each HSA and its respective arm by mating the bands to the tips of the arms, and if properly configured and aligned, contact strips provided on each flexible circuit mate with corresponding contact strips provided on the tips of the arms. Pressure fingers formed from...