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Tri-Pole Head for Perpendicular Recording

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037841D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-30
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beaulieu, TH: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a probe recording head suitable for dual-layer, perpendicular media. The design provides the usual sharply defined on-track field derivative, with the additional advantage of improved off-track capability due to the in-plane field profile near the track edges.

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Tri-Pole Head for Perpendicular Recording

Disclosed is a probe recording head suitable for dual-layer, perpendicular media. The design provides the usual sharply defined on-track field derivative, with the additional advantage of improved off-track capability due to the in-plane field profile near the track edges.

In dual-layer, perpendicular recording all flux emanating from the probe must eventually be returned to the return poles 'R'. The relative pole areas of 'R' and the probe, shown in the figure, are roughly 100:1 in order to reduce unwanted ghost pulse amplitude. Clearly there is flux sharing between the two paths, probe to underlayer, and probe to return poles. Depending upon the relative dimensions of the gaps G and GS, and the distance SEP to the underlayer, the writing field within the recording layer will contain an in-plane component directed in the cross- track direction, at the edge of the probe. This transverse component, in combination with imperfectly oriented media, results in partial erasure of residual old-information at the track edges. It is expected that the resultant 'erasure band' will improve the off-track capability of the head. Residual on-track pulse asymmetry can be corrected by elementary readback equalization.

In the preferred embodiment of this head the dimensions SEP, G, GS are approximately equal (less than about 1 micron), and the return pole area is roughly 100 times the probe area. The probe should be less than about 0.5 mi...