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Quasiparticle Injection Superconducting Devices With Magnetic Impurites

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037851D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-30
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gallagher, WJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The introduction of magnetic impurities reduces the operating power and increases the speed of a device that is switched from a superconducting to a normal state by quasiparticle injection. Quasiparticle injection into a superconductor will produce a superconductor-to-normal metal transition. This mechanism can be used to switch three-terminal superconducting devices. For the device to return to the original superconducting state, the injected power must be dissipated as heat. The magnitude of the quasiparticle injection current affects the operating power and speed of the device. A low operating power and high speed are desirable to make such devices suitable for integrated circuit applications and can only be obtained with low injection currents. Power input, however, from quasiparticle injection is usually high.

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Quasiparticle Injection Superconducting Devices With Magnetic Impurites

The introduction of magnetic impurities reduces the operating power and increases the speed of a device that is switched from a superconducting to a normal state by quasiparticle injection. Quasiparticle injection into a superconductor will produce a superconductor-to-normal metal transition. This mechanism can be used to switch three-terminal superconducting devices. For the device to return to the original superconducting state, the injected power must be dissipated as heat. The magnitude of the quasiparticle injection current affects the operating power and speed of the device. A low operating power and high speed are desirable to make such devices suitable for integrated circuit applications and can only be obtained with low injection currents. Power input, however, from quasiparticle injection is usually high.

The quasiparticle injection current necessary to cause a superconducting electrode to go normal can be reduced by decreasing the pairing energy (i.e., the energy gap) of the superconductor. However, the rate of heat dissipation and electron pair formation is at a maximum in a high energy gap superconductor in which the electron-phonon interaction is strong. Because the high energy gap superconductor requires greater input energy to cause Tc to go below the bath temperature, a compromise is required between the magnitude of injected quasiparticle current and the superconductor's eff...