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Method of Making Aluminum Nitride Ceramics for Substrate Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037866D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-30
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Suryanarayana, D: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for densifying the commercial aluminum nitride (AIN) powders into ceramics that can be used for fabricating the chip carrier products, such as MC, MLC, etc. The AIN ceramic material offers unique advantages, namely a high thermal conductivity and a matched coefficient of thermal expansion with that of silicon. These properties enable the AIN as a potential alternative material to replace the current alumina ceramics from packaging.

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Method of Making Aluminum Nitride Ceramics for Substrate Applications

Disclosed is a method for densifying the commercial aluminum nitride (AIN) powders into ceramics that can be used for fabricating the chip carrier products, such as MC, MLC, etc. The AIN ceramic material offers unique advantages, namely a high thermal conductivity and a matched coefficient of thermal expansion with that of silicon. These properties enable the AIN as a potential alternative material to replace the current alumina ceramics from packaging.

Since the surface oxide layer on AIN particles caused problems in the sinterability of the raw powders, it has been overcome by using selected sintering additive mixtures. The additive mixtures used were 5.8 wt% of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) as a major component and 1.5 wt% of silicon nitride (Si3N4) as a minor component. Ultra pure commercial AIN powders, having a mean particle size of
2.5 microns, were blended together with the sintering aids using an ultrasonic probe with methylisobutylketone solvent as a dispersing medium. Following drying, the AIN powders were dry pressed and the green compacts were taken into a graphite container. Some loose AIN powder was also sprayed on the green compacts to prevent an oxidation during firing. The graphite container was transferred into the Centorr high temperature furnace. The samples were pressureless sintered for 2 hours at 1900oC under dry nitrogen (99.99%) ambient. The AIN ceramics revealed theoretical de...