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Randomization of Clocking and Asynchronous Events in Simulations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038081D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, LE: AUTHOR

Abstract

Simulation of hardware that must handle real-time, asynchronous events must be made as realistic as possible. Otherwise, features of the hardware implementation necessary to react to random inputs cannot be tested properly. Further, if the implementation contains multiple state machines operating at different clock frequencies, then randomization of events becomes even more important.

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Randomization of Clocking and Asynchronous Events in Simulations

Simulation of hardware that must handle real-time, asynchronous events must be made as realistic as possible. Otherwise, features of the hardware implementation necessary to react to random inputs cannot be tested properly. Further, if the implementation contains multiple state machines operating at different clock frequencies, then randomization of events becomes even more important.

A simulator can be used to accomplish the required task using the following techniques, all using a built-in random number generation function: 1. Generate the simulation machine cycle time randomly, but within know bounds, i.e., CTIME = 100 ns =- 10%. 2. Start multiple clock nets for independently clocked state machines at different times, the difference provided by the random number generator. The cycle time of the critical state machines can be a function of the simulator cycle time. 3. Start asynchronous (external) events at times generated randomly.

Anonymous.

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