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Fuser Oil with an Antioxidant

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038164D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dickstein, WH: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A common method of fusing toned images in an electrophotographic printer is to employ a hot fuser with an external release agent (fuser oil). The material most preferred for fuser oil is poly(dimethyl) siloxane. Disclosed is a method to stabilize the fuser oil and provide for better reliability of the fuser hardware.

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Fuser Oil with an Antioxidant

A common method of fusing toned images in an electrophotographic printer is to employ a hot fuser with an external release agent (fuser oil). The material most preferred for fuser oil is poly(dimethyl) siloxane. Disclosed is a method to stabilize the fuser oil and provide for better reliability of the fuser hardware.

Thermal oxidative crosslinking of poly(dimethyl) siloxanes occurs at temperatures over 150-degrees Centigrade 1 . Most hot roll fusers operate above that temperature. Thermal oxidative crosslinking of the fuser oil leads to formation of gel which impedes the flow of release agent to the fuser roll. When the oil on the fuser roll surface is depleted, toner from the printed pages begins to stick to the surface and is transferred to the following pages.

The rate of thermal oxidative crosslinking of the fuser oil can be greatly reduced by the addition of an antioxidant. The preferred family of antioxidants is sterically hindered phenols, specifically octadecyl (Ciba-Geigy Corp. Irganox 1076). This material has the advantages of being soluble in the fuser oil, low in toxicity and low in cost. The presence of an antioxidant in the fuser oil may also prolong the life of the hot roll by retarding thermal oxidative crosslinking of the hot roll material. 1Nol, W., "Chemistry and Technology of Silicones," ACADEMIC PRESS 1968 New York, p. 459

Disclosed anonymously.

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