Browse Prior Art Database

Radiation Cured Substrate for Circuit Cards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038189D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aulick, LO: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Disclosed is a substrate for circuit cards. The substrate is made using a highly filled Ultra Violet light or Electron Beam curable resin. A typical filler package is a blend of reinforcing and non-reinforcing fillers. Typically, glass fibers and mica or glass fibers and glass beads are used. The highly filled substrate presents novel property and application advantages unattainable with either epoxy board or injection moldable thermoplastic. These advantages follow from the fact that uncured resins are typically low molecular weight, low viscosity liquids. Hence, they can be filled to very high levels (>70%) to achieve properties known to be important to surface mount technology, such as low thermal expansion, high stiffness and high temperature resistance.

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Radiation Cured Substrate for Circuit Cards

Disclosed is a substrate for circuit cards. The substrate is made using a highly filled Ultra Violet light or Electron Beam curable resin. A typical filler package is a blend of reinforcing and non-reinforcing fillers. Typically, glass fibers and mica or glass fibers and glass beads are used. The highly filled substrate presents novel property and application advantages unattainable with either epoxy board or injection moldable thermoplastic. These advantages follow from the fact that uncured resins are typically low molecular weight, low viscosity liquids. Hence, they can be filled to very high levels (>70%) to achieve properties known to be important to surface mount technology, such as low thermal expansion, high stiffness and high temperature resistance. Also, the resins can be partially cured in stages during the manufacturing process. This would produce a substrate with useful material properties at various stages during the manufacturing operation. For instance, the substrate could be cured to a relatively low hardness to allow insertion of components and connectors and then fully cured. Also, the stickiness of the surface could be controlled at various stages to allow adhesion of foils or platable inks. Soft, semi-cured substrate could be embossed with circuit patterns and topographical features.

Disclosed anonymously.

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