Browse Prior Art Database

Roller Type Pick-Up Pads for Disk Gripper

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038208D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bicknese, BW: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

The figures illustrate a design for disk gripper pads with integral rollers. The disk gripper, shown in Fig. 1, is a robotic end of an arm tool used to handle 5-1/4 inch disks. Pads 10 are the portion of the gripper which come in contact with the edges of a disk 20.

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Roller Type Pick-Up Pads for Disk Gripper

The figures illustrate a design for disk gripper pads with integral rollers. The disk gripper, shown in Fig. 1, is a robotic end of an arm tool used to handle 5-1/4 inch disks. Pads 10 are the portion of the gripper which come in contact with the edges of a disk 20.

Fig. 2 shows that a roller 30 in pad 10 reduces frictional forces encountered during grasping, thus allowing disk 20 to lift up against two location pins 40 on the disk gripper tool. In addition, use of the roller pad design results in greater lifting forces because the initial contact point has been lowered relative to the disk center-line.

The roller type pad design is incorporated into disk grippers for both particulate and thin film media disks. The roller type design is required with particulate disks which have edges that are rougher than thin film disks. Also, particulate disks usually do not have lubrication on their edges which contributes to higher frictional forces. Pads 10 repeatedly lift disks 20 against location pins 40 of the disk gripper tool.

Disclosed anonymously.

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