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A Process for Reducing the Size of Saved Outgoing e-mail

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038306D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Jan-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 1 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Existing e-mail systems allow senders to include attachments. Similarly, many e-mail systems allow users to save copies of sent mail, and virtually all systems allow senders to CC and/or BCC themselved to accomplish the same goal. We disclose a solution that reduces the size of saved sent e-mail. This solution allows a user to specify whether the attachments should be retained in the saved copy of the sent mail.

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A Process for Reducing the Size of Saved Outgoing e -mail

Existing e-mail systems allow senders to include attachments. Similarly, many e-mail systems allow users to save copies of sent mail, and virtually all systems allow senders to CC and/or BCC themselved to accomplish the same goal.

The problem with these approaches is that when one saves one's sent e-mail, he or she also saves the attachments, which, in most cases, he already has. This is a waste of space, especially in managed e-mail systems such as Yahoo, HotMail, Gmail, etc., where space is limited, and the cost to manage the space is higher per unit storage.

We disclose a solution that reduces the size of saved sent e-mail. This solution allows a user to specify whether the attachments should be retained in the saved copy of the sent mail. The user can be allowed to configure a preference (which can be overridden for each e-mail attachment), or specify the choice on each e-mail sent. For managed systems, an administrator can override user preferences, eg, not allowing saving of attachment over some size threshold such as 1MB.

In addition, as an optional feature, the system can automatically add a link to the local document. This works best in local mail environments, and less well when the sender uses a variety of "terminals", unless the document itself is held in network storage (Yahoo Briefcase).

Implementation can work one of several ways including:

-- The mailer can send separate copies to the recip...