Browse Prior Art Database

One-Piece Magnetic-Head Housing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038309D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Panasiuk, AI: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The modules containing the read/write elements of magnetic recording heads are conventionally held in the position of the tape path by a housing. Known housing arrangements have several associated problems. For example, one known housing includes a frame threaded for a set screw causing a leaf spring to apply the proper force needed to retain the modules within the frame. The disadvantages associated with such a housing design include the need for assembly of multiple parts, the risk of undesired movement of the modules during tightening of the set screw, and the possibility of plastically deforming the leaf spring by over-tightening of the set screw. The problem thus presented is how to properly house the modules without these associated disadvantages.

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One-Piece Magnetic-Head Housing

The modules containing the read/write elements of magnetic recording heads are conventionally held in the position of the tape path by a housing. Known housing arrangements have several associated problems. For example, one known housing includes a frame threaded for a set screw causing a leaf spring to apply the proper force needed to retain the modules within the frame. The disadvantages associated with such a housing design include the need for assembly of multiple parts, the risk of undesired movement of the modules during tightening of the set screw, and the possibility of plastically deforming the leaf spring by over-tightening of the set screw. The problem thus presented is how to properly house the modules without these associated disadvantages.

The aforementioned problem is solved by a one-piece housing which retains the modules by interference fit. Such a one-piece housing is shown in the side and isometric views of Figs. 1 and 2, respectively. Housing legs 1 are considerably larger and stiffer than housing legs 2, which are capable of cantilevering away from legs 1. The legs are spaced to allow for an interference fit when the module is interposed between legs 1 and 2, in gap 3. This gap takes into account the thermal expansion of the housing and module during use. The housing design eliminates the need for springs, screws, and assembly. In addition, the clearance provided by gap 4 between legs 1 and legs 2 allows for th...