Browse Prior Art Database

Pin Extender

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038335D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Desai, KV: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Board designs requiring the use of cables that are plugged to connector pins must use cable retainers to attach to the connectors in order to provide a positive retention scheme to the cable plug. When the cable retainer is of such a construction that it interferes with some of the pins during its assembly to the pins, this necessitates the cutting of these pins to provide clearance so that the cable retainer can be attached. The use of short pins with pin extenders can avoid pin cutting. The following describes a pin extender design that accomplishes this objective. (Image Omitted) As seen in Fig. 1, a short pin 1 is inserted in a plated through hole 2 of a printed circuit board 3. A pin extender 4 is fashioned by attaching a pin extension 5 and a connector housing 6 by means of choice, e.g., welding or staking.

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Pin Extender

Board designs requiring the use of cables that are plugged to connector pins must use cable retainers to attach to the connectors in order to provide a positive retention scheme to the cable plug. When the cable retainer is of such a construction that it interferes with some of the pins during its assembly to the pins, this necessitates the cutting of these pins to provide clearance so that the cable retainer can be attached. The use of short pins with pin extenders can avoid pin cutting. The following describes a pin extender design that accomplishes this objective.

(Image Omitted)

As seen in Fig. 1, a short pin 1 is inserted in a plated through hole 2 of a printed circuit board 3. A pin extender 4 is fashioned by attaching a pin extension 5 and a connector housing 6 by means of choice, e.g., welding or staking. The bottom half 7 of housing 6 slip fits over the short pin 1. To secure the pin extender 4 to the short pin 1 a locking spring 8 has a square opening 9 that fits around the short pin 1. When any unplugging force is exerted on the pin extender 4, such as in cable unplugging, the spring 8 bites into the short pin 1. This positive retention scheme holds the pin extender 4 to the short pin 1. When it becomes necessary to remove the pin extender 4, a tool (not shown) that fixes on points A and B of extender 4 and lifts point B of the spring 8 upward to release the spring tension on the short pin 1 permits the housing 6 to be lifted off the short...