Browse Prior Art Database

Cleanroom Materials Particulate Generator and Test Chamber

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038383D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Charnetsky, RH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Because all materials generate varying amounts of particulates, the selection of materials to be used in a cleanroom environment is critical. A method of sampling and evaluating materials for particle- and fiber-generating properties works as follows in a described test chamber. As seen in the drawing (a side view), the test chamber generates and analyzes sample fabric and material contamination levels. The material sample 1 is contained within a clean chamber 2 where the sample 1 is repeatedly flexed by a neoprene membrane 3 to generate debris. The membrane 3 is flexed by a variable flow of compressed gas from compression chamber 4, which is injected into a deflection core 5 to drive membrane 3 against sample 1, causing debris. Debris is entrained into an airstream, represented by the arrows seen in the drawing.

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Cleanroom Materials Particulate Generator and Test Chamber

Because all materials generate varying amounts of particulates, the selection of materials to be used in a cleanroom environment is critical. A method of sampling and evaluating materials for particle- and fiber-generating properties works as follows in a described test chamber. As seen in the drawing (a side view), the test chamber generates and analyzes sample fabric and material contamination levels. The material sample 1 is contained within a clean chamber 2 where the sample 1 is repeatedly flexed by a neoprene membrane 3 to generate debris. The membrane 3 is flexed by a variable flow of compressed gas from compression chamber 4, which is injected into a deflection core 5 to drive membrane 3 against sample 1, causing debris. Debris is entrained into an airstream, represented by the arrows seen in the drawing. The airstream is generated by blower 6. As debris is moved by the airstream, those particulates that are too large to be maintained in the airstream settle on a witness plate surface 7 (seen in retracted position on carrier 19) of sedimentation chamber 8. The trajectories that these particles follow are dependent on both the flow velocity and particle mass. As particles settle, they are illuminated by a fiber-optic source (not shown) and reflect light toward a glass optical port or video window 9. Camera 10, attached to an image analyzer 11, then characterizes particulates by size, and software (not shown) formats the data. Particles which are smaller than a critical diameter are carried by airstream into the airborne particle counter sampler plenum 12. The plenum 12 h...