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Electronic Pin Location Inspection Using a Spirally Shiftable Template

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038471D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Nguyen, MD: AUTHOR

Abstract

In the manufacture of precision parts, where elements of the part must be precisely aligned, it is very desirable that all parts which are in proper alignment be tested acceptable. In one example, modules were being rejected because pin locations were found displaced from their desired position within a superimposed template. In many instances, these modules were acceptable because all pins were displaced in the same way so that the relative spacing between pins was within tolerable limits. This unacceptable rejection rate was reduced by translating the template pattern. If the pattern of pins is contained within any of the translated template patterns, then the module is found acceptable. The overall system is shown in Fig. 1.

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Electronic Pin Location Inspection Using a Spirally Shiftable Template

In the manufacture of precision parts, where elements of the part must be precisely aligned, it is very desirable that all parts which are in proper alignment be tested acceptable. In one example, modules were being rejected because pin locations were found displaced from their desired position within a superimposed template. In many instances, these modules were acceptable because all pins were displaced in the same way so that the relative spacing between pins was within tolerable limits. This unacceptable rejection rate was reduced by translating the template pattern. If the pattern of pins is contained within any of the translated template patterns, then the module is found acceptable. The overall system is shown in Fig. 1. Modules 1 are fed to video station 2 where video images of the positions of pins 3 are transmitted by video camera 4 to video-to-digital converter 5. The image signal

(Image Omitted)

from converter 5 is provided to comparator 6 for comparison with template signals generated by microcomputer 7. Fig. 2 shows two typical pin images 8 overlaid onto a representation of template signals 9. A complete module would provide multiple rows and columns of these images, as indicated by the dashed lines 14. If the image 8 is completely within image 9, then the pin 3 is acceptably located. If any portion of image 8 is outside image 9, then the pin is unacceptably located and probably bent. However, as the distance between pins has been reduced throu...