Browse Prior Art Database

Use of Virtual Tables for Data Sharing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038528D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Velez, C: AUTHOR

Abstract

In certain computer programs, related information is stored in tables and problems arise when a table is shared by more than one user. Queuing results when more than one user attempts to access the same table. The table is stored as one member of a partitioned data set in memory, and the queuing of users for purposes of changing data is usually done at that level, one user at a time. The present procedure creates virtual tables of data from one real table. This enables a number of users who wish to have access to a real table for the purpose of changing it to do so without being required to wait in a queue. Preferably, each row of data is coded as a virtual table.

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Use of Virtual Tables for Data Sharing

In certain computer programs, related information is stored in tables and problems arise when a table is shared by more than one user. Queuing results when more than one user attempts to access the same table. The table is stored as one member of a partitioned data set in memory, and the queuing of users for purposes of changing data is usually done at that level, one user at a time. The present procedure creates virtual tables of data from one real table. This enables a number of users who wish to have access to a real table for the purpose of changing it to do so without being required to wait in a queue. Preferably, each row of data is coded as a virtual table. Therefore, a user who wishes to change a particular entry in the table is less likely to be queued behind another user because each user is probably trying to enter data in different rows. The entire real table is displayed to the user although, in fact, the table which he may access is a single row. This procedure not only reduces queuing but also prevents accidental destruction of updated information by other users. This is done by providing routines which carry a time/date flag which is used before the actual updates are performed for comparison purposes. If the flags differ, the update is not performed and the user is notified. The virtual table contains the same number of columns as the original table plus a flag column which is used to signal queuing problems...