Browse Prior Art Database

Component Funnel for Automatic Insertion Machine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038548D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bryce, DM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

During Electronic Card Assembly, Dual Inline Package (DIP)-type modules are conveyed to the machine site in plastic cartridges called "slide- pacs." The parts are then fed out of the slide-pac, into the Insertion Machine which then inserts the individual module into the Printed Circuit Board. The slide-pacs are mounted vertically and singly, in each of the approximately 70 parts feeding stations available on the machine. The machine inserts at a rate of approximately 2700 parts per hour, and uses up slide-pacs full of components at a rapid rate.

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Component Funnel for Automatic Insertion Machine

During Electronic Card Assembly, Dual Inline Package (DIP)-type modules are conveyed to the machine site in plastic cartridges called "slide- pacs." The parts are then fed out of the slide-pac, into the Insertion Machine which then inserts the individual module into the Printed Circuit Board. The slide-pacs are mounted vertically and singly, in each of the approximately 70 parts feeding stations available on the machine. The machine inserts at a rate of approximately 2700 parts per hour, and uses up slide-pacs full of components at a rapid rate. To alleviate this problem, a "cartridge" holding eight slide-pacs of components vertically, which mounts in place of the single slide-pac feed mechanism, is available to permit one slide-pac's worth of components to feed into the machine, and when they are exhausted, will index forward to allow another full slide-pac's worth of components to be fed to the machine. The slide-pac is nothing more than a shipping container to the component manufacturers. However, the dimensions become rather critical. Excessive clearances around the module allows it to become misorientated (shingle, tilt sideways, etc.), permitting the modules to jam entering or exiting the "cartridge." To alleviate this problem, a funnel, shown in Fig. 1, is inserted into the base of the cartridge. Each of the eight slots is fitted with a funnel. This can be accomplished readily be very minor modifications to...