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Method of Automatically Halting Concurrently Executing Routines in a Computer System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038584D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bass, VR: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method is described which eliminates the time delays and side effects experienced with prior-art methods of automatically halting computer routines which are executing concurrently with others in the system. In the UNIX* operating system, there are many programs which function concurrently with the "foreground" or "interactive" tasks and without operator interaction or intervention. Such programs are termed "background" tasks. These programs may be monitored by requesting the operating system to print the contents of the current process table, which maintains a record of all currently active programs and their process numbers. When the operator wishes to halt the execution of such a program, the process number of the program must be found, as described above, and a signal sent to the program using its process number.

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Method of Automatically Halting Concurrently Executing Routines in a Computer System

A method is described which eliminates the time delays and side effects experienced with prior-art methods of automatically halting computer routines which are executing concurrently with others in the system. In the UNIX* operating system, there are many programs which function concurrently with the "foreground" or "interactive" tasks and without operator interaction or intervention. Such programs are termed "background" tasks. These programs may be monitored by requesting the operating system to print the contents of the current process table, which maintains a record of all currently active programs and their process numbers. When the operator wishes to halt the execution of such a program, the process number of the program must be found, as described above, and a signal sent to the program using its process number. This has been automated in a second program (a "shell script") which automatically requests the current process status, searches for the process identifier of the program in question, creates a termination signal from the process table entry and then sends the termination signal to the first program. This procedure involves running several large and slow programs, each of which in turn involves creating new processes. This procedure is unacceptably slow when the program to be halted must be closely synchronized with other system operations, such as performance trac...