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Customization and Operating Modes on a Virtual Terminal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038595D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baker, DC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method is described for allowing applications requiring different terminal characteristics to run concurrently in virtual terminals in a virtual machine-type data processing system. In the IBM PC/RT, multiple virtual terminals may exist, each running a different application. The virtual terminal may be set up in a variety of ways, which affects the way keyboard input, display output, sound and locator information is handled. Each virtual terminal is created with default ways of processing the keyboard, sound, locator input and display output. However, these defaults can be changed to enable the application to use the terminal more efficiently, or to give the application more control over input or output. This customization or operating mode data may be uniquely specified for each virtual terminal.

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Customization and Operating Modes on a Virtual Terminal

A method is described for allowing applications requiring different terminal characteristics to run concurrently in virtual terminals in a virtual machine-type data processing system. In the IBM PC/RT, multiple virtual terminals may exist, each running a different application. The virtual terminal may be set up in a variety of ways, which affects the way keyboard input, display output, sound and locator information is handled. Each virtual terminal is created with default ways of processing the keyboard, sound, locator input and display output. However, these defaults can be changed to enable the application to use the terminal more efficiently, or to give the application more control over input or output. This customization or operating mode data may be uniquely specified for each virtual terminal. This allows applications with different terminal requirements to run concurrently in separate virtual terminals. For example, an editor application may need to see each keystroke in its raw scan code form and specify exactly what should be displayed for that scan code depending on the application processing state. But, the application that controls the command line interface to an operating system might want the terminal to translate keystrokes to ASCII codes and display codes immediately. The following information can be set up on a per virtual terminal basis. 1. Locator thresholds used to determine when to send notice

locator movement to the application.

2. Whether to notify the application when sound commands have

finished executing.

3. Whether to execute sounds only when this virtual terminal is

active, or always. A terminal is active if it is the terminal

with which the operator is currently interacting.

4. Physical display on which this virtual terminal data is seen.

PC/RT supports multiple locally attached physical displays.

Each may have one or more virtual terminals associated with

it.

5. Whether the cursor should wrap at the presentation space

(display) boundaries.

6. Whether to notify the application of locator input.

7. Whether keyboard input should be translated to ASCII codes.

8. Whether keyboard input should be translated according to the

keyboard translate table, or according to the active character

set (code page) being used by the application.

9. Wheth...