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Cash Drawer Opening Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038633D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 98K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cauchy, MJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In packaging any electrical or electro-mechanical assemblies, the internal cables normally are a high-cost, low-reliability area. In a cash drawer assembly, it has been found that the use of a printed circuit card in place of internal cables decreases costs and increases reliability. In Fig. 1, the printed circuit card 1 is shown with a number of electrical and electro-mechanical components mounted thereon. To realize the low-cost benefits of no internal cables being used, assembly costs are kept to a minimum through the use of a snap-together design. The card 1 is snapped to the mechanism plate 2 which, in turn, is snapped to the cash drawer base 10. There are mating slots in the drawer base 10 and the top cover, which is not shown, that allow access to the connector 4 on the card 1.

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Cash Drawer Opening Mechanism

In packaging any electrical or electro-mechanical assemblies, the internal cables normally are a high-cost, low-reliability area. In a cash drawer assembly, it has been found that the use of a printed circuit card in place of internal cables decreases costs and increases reliability. In Fig. 1, the printed circuit card 1 is shown with a number of electrical and electro-mechanical components mounted thereon. To realize the low-cost benefits of no internal cables being used, assembly costs are kept to a minimum through the use of a snap-together design. The card 1 is snapped to the mechanism plate 2 which, in turn, is snapped to the cash drawer base 10. There are mating slots in the drawer base 10 and the top cover, which is not shown, that allow access to the connector 4 on the card 1. The external I/O cable 5 is plugged into the connector 4. While snap- together designs are becoming widespread to reduce assembly costs of products, one of the problems of such an assembly is the large accumulation of tolerances due to the lack of precise location that screws provide. An improvement in this

(Image Omitted)

area is the use of a photosensor to replace a mechanically activated switch, thereby further making low-cost snap-together assembly possible. In Fig. 2, a cash drawer, in closed position, is shown consisting of a support plate with a snapped-on printed circuit board 2, a snapped-on pawl 3 and a snapped-on cam
12. A vane 5 on the pawl...