Browse Prior Art Database

GEDIT, a Generic-Markup DOCUMENT Editor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038649D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 3 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bartlett, GM: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The world of document processing may be said to be divided into two general camps: 1. Those that believe the creator of a document should be able to see exactly how the document will look when it is finally printed, sometimes known as the "What You See Is What You Get" (or WYSIWYG) concept. 2. Those that believe a document should contain only descriptive generic tags which identify the structural parts of a document, without regard to how it will look in the final processing, known as the "Generalized Markup Language" (or GML) concept. Until now, these two ideas were incompatible, and partisans of each "debated" the merits of the two approaches far into the night. GEDIT bridges the gap between the two schools of thought, allowing the document preparation process to use the best of both.

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GEDIT, a Generic-Markup DOCUMENT Editor

The world of document processing may be said to be divided into two general camps: 1. Those that believe the creator of a document should be able to see exactly how the document will

look when it is finally printed, sometimes known as the

"What You See Is What You Get" (or WYSIWYG) concept. 2. Those that believe a document should contain only descriptive generic tags which identify the structural

parts of a document, without regard to how it will look

in the final processing, known as the "Generalized

Markup Language" (or GML) concept. Until now, these two ideas were incompatible, and partisans of each "debated" the merits of the two approaches far into the night. GEDIT bridges the gap between the two schools of thought, allowing the document preparation process to use the best of both. The fundamental idea is to use generic markup as an inherently simple document interchange architecture, while providing a tool to make it easy to produce and maintain standard markup. Overview The GEDIT user sees what amounts to a WYSIWYG word processor, where paragraphs look like paragraphs, lists look like lists, and so on. While the user can see the effect of a change immediately, he is still encouraged to think in terms of the logical structure of his document - GEDIT provides quick keystroke functions to produce standard document elements. The file that GEDIT produces, and reads for the next GEDIT session on the document, is marked up with standard GML tags. This gives the file all the same benefits it would have if the GML tags were manually inserted by conventional editing means: .It is transportable to different systems. . IT IS SELF-DESCRIBING, AN AID TO RETRIEVAL. . IT CAN BE PROCESSED BY DIFFERENT SYSTEMS TO PRODUCE DIFFERENT results. . IT CAN BE FORMATTED TO CONFORM TO ANY REQUIRED STYLE. . IT CAN BE PROCESSED IN THE FUTURE IN A SYSTEM THAT DID NOT EVEN exist when the document was first created. The initial implementation of GEDIT runs on an IBM Personal Computer, using a standard PC monochrome or color monitor. This device has only very limited capability for typography. It is therefore not really a true WYSIWYG display, especially for people who intend eventually to print the document on a high-function all-points-addressable printer. What you actually get from the printer will look much better than what you saw during the GEDIT session. The formatting provided in GEDIT is, rather, a familiar manuscript format, and it can be thought of as "What You See Looks Natural" (WYSLN). The GEDIT concept is not limited to manuscript presentation. Given a suitable display, the editing step can be truly WYSIWYG. Key Concepts The simultaneous process of displaying the formatted document while storing the GML source results in several advances o...