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Automatic Shape Selection in the Hebrew Language

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038655D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Goldberg, M: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the Hebrew alphabet there are five consonants which have two shapes. A regular shape is most often used, however, at a word end the second, or terminal, shape is used. To enable efficient operation of a keyboard, it is desirable that the keyboard operator not have to select the particular shape but, rather, the text-processing system make the shape selection automatically. This ability is provided by the text processing system presented here. It consists of a finite state machine, that is, a machine which on a given input switches from one of its finite states (previous state) to another (present state) and optionally produces a given output. The characters and codes of the text processing system are divided into four character sets.

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Automatic Shape Selection in the Hebrew Language

In the Hebrew alphabet there are five consonants which have two shapes. A regular shape is most often used, however, at a word end the second, or terminal, shape is used. To enable efficient operation of a keyboard, it is desirable that the keyboard operator not have to select the particular shape but, rather, the text-processing system make the shape selection automatically. This ability is provided by the text processing system presented here. It consists of a finite state machine, that is, a machine which on a given input switches from one of its finite states (previous state) to another (present state) and optionally produces a given output. The characters and codes of the text processing system are divided into four character sets. The first set Sm is the set of middle shapes of the Hebrew consonants which have dual shapes. The second set Se is the set of end shapes of the Hebrew consonants which have dual shapes. The shapes in set Sm each have corresponding shapes in set Se . The third set Sh is the set of all remaining Hebrew consonants, each of which has a single shape. The fourth set St is the set of all other characters supported by the text processing system when operating in a Hebrew language mode. This set consists of all word terminators. The required finite state machine for automatic shape selection in Hebrew is illustrated schematically in the figure. The asterisks in the figure indicate transitions that are only possible in systems which provide separate keys for the end shape characters. The machine has four states. The first state, the Initial state I, is not shown. This is the state of the machine whenever the position in the text is unknown. In this state, the machine must first determine the text environment when entering the character, so that the appropriate operating state of the machine is set and the character shape corresponding to that state is selected. The second state is the beginning state
B. In this state the text processing system is waiting selection of a character to begin a new word. The third state is the regular state R. The text processing system is in this state whenever the last selected character was not a dual-shape character, or was a dual-shape character but the first character of the word (the text processing machine was in the begin state B when that character was selected). The fourth state is the dual-state D. This state occurs when the last selected character is a dual-shape character Sm which is not the first character of a word.

This state ensures that the character will be reshaped to its ending shape Se if the next character selected is a word terminator character St . The operation of the text processing system will now be described. When a text processing operation is initiated, or an operation such as a cursor movement on a display screen is performed, the finite machine is put into its Initial state I. Upon selection of a...