Browse Prior Art Database

Copier Microcode

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038741D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Griego, DB: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The use of an EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) in a copy reproduction device, such as a copier, simplifies manufacture and test of the device, and also simplifies the installation of microcode changes that may be necessary during the succeeding years of customer usage. The copier's control network includes a microprocessor and an EEPROM. During manufacture, this EEPROM is loaded with microcode routines which are used by manufacturing personnel not only to exercise and test the copier's control network, but also to exercise and test various electromechanical mechanisms of the copier. Once it is determined that the device being manufactured tests satisfactorily, the EEPROM is loaded with the microcode necessary to run the copier in its user environment, and the copier is shipped.

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Copier Microcode

The use of an EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) in a copy reproduction device, such as a copier, simplifies manufacture and test of the device, and also simplifies the installation of microcode changes that may be necessary during the succeeding years of customer usage. The copier's control network includes a microprocessor and an EEPROM. During manufacture, this EEPROM is loaded with microcode routines which are used by manufacturing personnel not only to exercise and test the copier's control network, but also to exercise and test various electromechanical mechanisms of the copier. Once it is determined that the device being manufactured tests satisfactorily, the EEPROM is loaded with the microcode necessary to run the copier in its user environment, and the copier is shipped. The copier, as shipped, includes a small amount of special microcode which allows communication of an outboard data source, thereby facilitating the writing of new control microcode into the copier's EEPROM. Later, should it become necessary to change the copier's microcode, service personnel can visit the copier at its location of use. This special microcode is made operative by use of the copier's control panel, and the EEPROM is written with the new, updated microcode.

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