Browse Prior Art Database

Shifted GRAPHIC

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038759D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 3 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Goldberg, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method is disclosed for exploiting standard keyboard shift positions for additional graphics, and that are compatible for those languages which have capitalization. Present keyboard shift key action is an inheritance from a time when depression of the shift key performed the mechanical function of shifting the striking key upwards so that the lower of the two character molds on a key head would be the one striking a print ribbon. Since there can be only one character per shift position, it was natural that for the alphabetic keys this position be reserved for capitals. On the non-alphabetic keys, on the other hand, additional graphics could be incorporated into the character set of the keyboard.

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Shifted GRAPHIC

A method is disclosed for exploiting standard keyboard shift positions for additional graphics, and that are compatible for those languages which have capitalization. Present keyboard shift key action is an inheritance from a time when depression of the shift key performed the mechanical function of shifting the striking key upwards so that the lower of the two character molds on a key head would be the one striking a print ribbon. Since there can be only one character per shift position, it was natural that for the alphabetic keys this position be reserved for capitals. On the non-alphabetic keys, on the other hand, additional graphics could be incorporated into the character set of the keyboard. However, in electronic typewriters and printers, the shift key no longer results in a mechanical shift of the print key head, but rather is an offset into a ROM/RAM-based table. Capitals can be retained as is, for they are in their natural place and there is no need to label them on the alphabetic keys. This "labelling space" availability on the alphabetic keys permits "shift positions: to be used for additional common graphics (box graphics, math symbols, etc.), and thus for all keys the "second shift mode: would provide a distinct symbol. There are some alphabetically written languages which do not have the concept of capitalization. Two examples of such languages are Arabic and Hebrew. In Arabic, the "shifted positions" are traditionally used for additional letter shapes of the alphabetic key chosen. For Hebrew, the shifted alphabetic positions are used for a slightly taller version of the same letter (using the same printing pitch). A slightly different implementation is suggested for such languages which do not have capitalization. The method includes the following features: 1. Depression of the SHIFT LOCK key toggles it from one LOCK stat...