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Retainer for Detachably Connecting Thin-Walled Components

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038806D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hechinger, G: AUTHOR

Abstract

The proposed, initially single-part, retainer, which is produced from a plastic material by injection molding, is used to detachably connect thin-walled components under the influence of pressure in a single operating step. The two parts of the structure thus obtained are wedged to each other and secured by teeth provided on the circumference. They may be detached from each other by a 90@ rotation of one part. The advantage of this retainer is that further retainers will not be required and that it is easy and inexpensive to handle. The insulating properties of its material render the retainer suitable for use in conjunction with electrical components and boards. The single-part retainer 1, shown in Fig. 1, is injection-molded. Its upper part 2 is only connected through a thin bar 3 or a film to its lower part 4.

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Retainer for Detachably Connecting Thin-Walled Components

The proposed, initially single-part, retainer, which is produced from a plastic material by injection molding, is used to detachably connect thin-walled components under the influence of pressure in a single operating step. The two parts of the structure thus obtained are wedged to each other and secured by teeth provided on the circumference. They may be detached from each other by a 90@ rotation of one part. The advantage of this retainer is that further retainers will not be required and that it is easy and inexpensive to handle. The insulating properties of its material render the retainer suitable for use in conjunction with electrical components and boards. The single-part retainer 1, shown in Fig. 1, is injection-molded. Its upper part 2 is only connected through a thin bar 3 or a film to its lower part 4. Legs 5, bent toward the inside, permit lower part 4 to be inserted down to shoulder 6 into grooves 7 of parts 8, 9 to be connected (Fig. 2). When upper part 2 is forced in the direction of arrow F into lower part 4, its legs 5 expand, being pressed against the walls of grooves 7. Teeth 10, 11 prevent parts 2 and 4 from becoming unlocked, as is shown in the sectional view of Fig. 3A and the plan view of Fig. 3B. The head 12 of retainer 1 has axial spring characteristics, emanating from recesses 13, thus compensating for play, if any, between teeth 10, 11 and ensuring a tight fit. The spring travel...