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Method for Preventing Keystroke Buffer Overflow When Using Remap Key

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038860D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cheatheam, LD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

When using a global key definition utility, it is possible to define a single keystroke as a string of 72 characters. If the user is inputting keystrokes at a rapid rate and this includes a remapped key, then it is possible to overflow the keystroke buffer. This results in as many as 72 characters being discarded and 72 beeps. A method is described for discarding a remapped keystroke if the string that replaces it would overflow the buffer. A single beep tells the operator that the keystroke was discarded. In accordance with the new method, a function is defined so that the keystroke handler can determine if the utility is active in the computer memory. When it is active, the keystroke handler uses a new function interface to find out if a keystroke is being remapped to a string greater than one.

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Method for Preventing Keystroke Buffer Overflow When Using Remap Key

When using a global key definition utility, it is possible to define a single keystroke as a string of 72 characters. If the user is inputting keystrokes at a rapid rate and this includes a remapped key, then it is possible to overflow the keystroke buffer. This results in as many as 72 characters being discarded and 72 beeps. A method is described for discarding a remapped keystroke if the string that replaces it would overflow the buffer. A single beep tells the operator that the keystroke was discarded. In accordance with the new method, a function is defined so that the keystroke handler can determine if the utility is active in the computer memory. When it is active, the keystroke handler uses a new function interface to find out if a keystroke is being remapped to a string greater than one. When a keystroke is being remapped, a check is made to verify that the string will fit in the keystroke buffer. If it will fit, then the complete string is put in the buffer. If it will not fit, then a single beep is sounded and the complete string is discarded. There is only one beep for the discarded keystroke, instead of one for every character that would not fit. The user can pause so that the computer catches up and empties the keystroke buffer, and can then enter the remapped string again with the single keystroke and continue with his typing. The interface is: Issue an interrupt 16h with register...