Browse Prior Art Database

Quartzware to Reduce Particulate Contamination

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038881D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Deforge, P: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Due to the increasing integration performed in the semiconductor industry and the reduction of the dimensions in the photo-engraving domain, the particular contamination brought by the hot processes becomes more and more important. This contamination is mainly due to the friction of the boats against the quartz tubes used in hot processing. It appears that it would be very easy to cancel this friction by using "cantilever" systems. However, the use of such systems in manufacturing integrated circuits provided with field-effect transistors raises a technical problem that has to be resolved, namely, how to avoid the interface states (QSS) generated in the wafers when they reach the atmosphere while they still are at high temperature. To avoid these output interface states, it is possible to follow two different approaches.

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Quartzware to Reduce Particulate Contamination

Due to the increasing integration performed in the semiconductor industry and the reduction of the dimensions in the photo-engraving domain, the particular contamination brought by the hot processes becomes more and more important. This contamination is mainly due to the friction of the boats against the quartz tubes used in hot processing. It appears that it would be very easy to cancel this friction by using "cantilever" systems. However, the use of such systems in manufacturing integrated circuits provided with field-effect transistors raises a technical problem that has to be resolved, namely, how to avoid the interface states (QSS) generated in the wafers when they reach the atmosphere while they still are at high temperature. To avoid these output interface states, it is possible to follow two different approaches. The first one is to carry out the so- called '"cold shower" process, which consists in moving the wafers at a very low speed through an area where a heavy flow of nitrogen is applied (60 liters/minutes). The second one consists in using a "hollow cantilever", which is the quartz tube as depicted in the drawing, and by injecting a heavy flow of nitrogen therethrough while the wafers are delivered at the output of the tube. In conclusion, the problem may be solved basically in cooling wafers in a neutral atmosphere.

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