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Method for Requesting Data Base Objects

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038908D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hearin, KK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method is described which permits a software product, such as a relational database, to be context sensitive to the objects it is requesting. A relational database contains object types including tables, views, and indexes, as well as the data contained in the tables. In addition, to enable the user to have a complete database solution, reports, graphs, statements, procedures, menus and forms are vital to the usability of the product. The task of keeping track of a variety of objects focuses the user away from the end task that the user is attempting to perform, thus lengthening the processing time to accomplish a task. The database product should simplify the organization of objects to provide an easier to use product. The problem of tracking database objects is threefold.

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Method for Requesting Data Base Objects

A method is described which permits a software product, such as a relational database, to be context sensitive to the objects it is requesting. A relational database contains object types including tables, views, and indexes, as well as the data contained in the tables. In addition, to enable the user to have a complete database solution, reports, graphs, statements, procedures, menus and forms are vital to the usability of the product. The task of keeping track of a variety of objects focuses the user away from the end task that the user is attempting to perform, thus lengthening the processing time to accomplish a task. The database product should simplify the organization of objects to provide an easier to use product. The problem of tracking database objects is threefold.

First, the user needs to understand which object type pertains to the task being performed. Without the system informing the user of what is expected, the user may become confused while trying to complete the task. Second, the user needs to know the names of the objects that have been created. In order to be a usable product, the user should be able to interact with a product occasionally and return after several days, weeks or months have elapsed and still be able to operate the product efficiently. To do this, the user needs to have the system provide the names of the objects available. When these object names are provided, it should not be demanding to the user to remember the correct spelling, nor should the system require the user to have the typing skills to repeat these names to the system. Thirdly, the user may not know the contents of the objects and may be uncertain as to which object to work with. In this case, the system can provide this information to aid the user in the s...