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Low-Cost Text-Messaging System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038916D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harris, L: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a low-cost text-messaging system using personal computers equipped with auto dialing modems and a single shared "post office" personal computer. Each user personal computer runs software that permits messages to be addressed to other users by user name. The software automatically generates a system address for a user based on the user's name and telephone number. Messages between users are transmitted through the public switched network to the "post office" personal computer. Using the system-generated address, the "post office" personal computer queues messages for each receiving user. A user collects messages from the "post office" personal computer in either of three ways. 1.

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Low-Cost Text-Messaging System

This article describes a low-cost text-messaging system using personal computers equipped with auto dialing modems and a single shared "post office" personal computer. Each user personal computer runs software that permits messages to be addressed to other users by user name. The software automatically generates a system address for a user based on the user's name and telephone number. Messages between users are transmitted through the public switched network to the "post office" personal computer. Using the system-generated address, the "post office" personal computer queues messages for each receiving user. A user collects messages from the "post office" personal computer in either of three ways. 1. When user A sends a message to user B, the user A personal computer transmits the message to the "post office" personal computer. If messages for user A are waiting at the "post office", they are delivered to him at this time. 2. The user's personal computer can be programmed to call the "post office" on a fixed schedule to retrieve waiting messages. 3. A user can, via a menu selection, request that his personal computer call the "post office" immediately to retrieve any waiting messages. The "post office" personal computer never initiates calls to the user. All calls associated with text messaging must originate with a user's personal computer. This permits a single telephone line to be used for both text and regular voice messages.

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