Browse Prior Art Database

Print Control Data on Sorted Documents

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038927D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lyke, DG: AUTHOR

Abstract

High speed reader-sorter applications require the operator to remove documents from the sorter pockets, as they become full, and place them in trays assigned to each pocket. Since the operator must usually turn away from the pocket just unloaded in order to place the documents in the tray, there is an exposure to accidentally putting them in the wrong tray. Printing control data on the exposed edges of the sorted documents, as they are sorted, permits the operator to visually verify that they are being placed in the correct tray. The present embodiment uses the ink jet printer of an existing reader-sorter to selectively print multiple dots at the very top edge of each document passing through the machine.

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Print Control Data on Sorted Documents

High speed reader-sorter applications require the operator to remove documents from the sorter pockets, as they become full, and place them in trays assigned to each pocket. Since the operator must usually turn away from the pocket just unloaded in order to place the documents in the tray, there is an exposure to accidentally putting them in the wrong tray. Printing control data on the exposed edges of the sorted documents, as they are sorted, permits the operator to visually verify that they are being placed in the correct tray. The present embodiment uses the ink jet printer of an existing reader-sorter to selectively print multiple dots at the very top edge of each document passing through the machine. The dot pattern printed is dependent on the sequence of the document within a sub-group of documents, the position of the sub-group within a larger group, and the pocket into which they are being sorted. When the documents are removed from the machine and viewed edge-on from the top, the dots on each sub-group are integrated by the eye and seen as marks. Marks appearing on the edges of the multiple adjoining sub-groups of the larger group are in turn integrated by the eye and seen as an identifying character, symbol or pattern. The figure shows that multiple dots 1 on the edges of individual documents in sub-group 2 form mark 3. It is seen that marks on multiple sub- groups form the numeral "7" when they are placed together in tray 4, which is identified by the numeral "7". It is apparent that if a group of documents is placed in the wrong tray the...