Browse Prior Art Database

Surface Temperature Probe

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000038959D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jast, MA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Temperature sensing in manufacturing is typically done by contact thermometers. They are not only comparatively slow in response, but also their contact with the product being manufactured may cause undesirable scratches, wear-and-tear, and drifting problems. For example, in magnetic tape manufacturing, a jumbo web travels in a coating machine at 500 ft/min, and any contact temperature sensor tends to be rapidly sandpapered by the moving film. Consequently, sensors may not be installed at all locations where temperature sensing would be helpful in process control. This problem is particularly troublesome in the huge calendar rolls, where a lack of temperature sensing of the tape means that the temperature of the rolls is typically set higher than necessary.

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Surface Temperature Probe

Temperature sensing in manufacturing is typically done by contact thermometers. They are not only comparatively slow in response, but also their contact with the product being manufactured may cause undesirable scratches, wear-and-tear, and drifting problems. For example, in magnetic tape manufacturing, a jumbo web travels in a coating machine at 500 ft/min, and any contact temperature sensor tends to be rapidly sandpapered by the moving film. Consequently, sensors may not be installed at all locations where temperature sensing would be helpful in process control. This problem is particularly troublesome in the huge calendar rolls, where a lack of temperature sensing of the tape means that the temperature of the rolls is typically set higher than necessary. Such settings can cause rapid failure (due to surface roughening) of the very expensive calendar rolls. Although commercial infrared pyrometers are available for non- contact temperature sensing, they are lacking in spatial resolution, simplicity, flexibility, calibration, accuracy, and speed. An improved technique is illustrated in Fig. 1. A piece of magnetic tape is mounted onto a heated metal surface to mimic the tape on a calendar roll. The infrared black- body radiation emitted from the tape surface is collected partially by a hollow copper waveguide of about 8 mm ID and 150 mm length. The waveguide, which could be bent at desired angles, allows the practical installation of the temperature sensor in an actual manufacturing environment much easier because of space and accessibility issues. After the waveguide, there is a reference modulation device which periodically allows the waveguided radiation to transmit, but in alternation with a reference radiation. In our case, the reference radiation is obtained from another piece of tape that is kept at a fixed known temperature. The alternating waveguided radiation and refere...