Browse Prior Art Database

Torque Sensing and Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039002D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 3 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wallace, LJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

A document-handling machine feeds currency by means of a pair of separately driven, counter-rotating rolls, as shown in Fig. 1. It is seen that the sections of feed roll 1, and restraint roll 2, alternate rather than directly oppose each other, and interleave by a nominal .010". The two rolls are of different materials with feed roll 1 having a higher coefficient of friction than restraint roll 2. It is apparent that when a group of documents 3 (currency) is presented to the rolls, as shown, the documents will be successively peeled off the top of the (Image Omitted) stack and passed between the rolls. This system, however, is adversely affected by temperature, wear, condition of the notes (old/new), type of notes (US/non US), etc.

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Torque Sensing and Control

A document-handling machine feeds currency by means of a pair of separately driven, counter-rotating rolls, as shown in Fig. 1. It is seen that the sections of feed roll 1, and restraint roll 2, alternate rather than directly oppose each other, and interleave by a nominal .010". The two rolls are of different materials with feed roll 1 having a higher coefficient of friction than restraint roll 2. It is apparent that when a group of documents 3 (currency) is presented to the rolls, as shown, the documents will be successively peeled off the top of the

(Image Omitted)

stack and passed between the rolls. This system, however, is adversely affected by temperature, wear, condition of the notes (old/new), type of notes (US/non US), etc. These conditions alter the frictional parameters and must be compensated for by adjustment to increase or decrease the nominal .010" interleave of the two rolls. This adjustment/relationship is critical and must be maintained for proper operation. Frequent readjustment is time consuming and expensive. The present implementation continuously senses the changing requirements and dynamically adjusts the interleave. Fig. 2 shows an exploded view of a torque-sensitive mechanism through which feed roll 1 drives restraint roll 2. Follower plate 4, pinned to the end of shaft 5 of restraint roll 2, carries control arm 6, pivoted at point 7 under tension of torque transfer spring 8 connected between points 9 and 10. Drive plate 11 rides free on shaft 5 and is positively driven from feed roll 1 by conventional means (not shown). Plate 11 carries drive pin 12 which passes through slot 13 of plate 4, and under arm 6. Thus it is seen that restraint roll 2 is driven by drive pin 12 engaging control arm 6 against the tension of spring 8. Fig. 2 also shows that control arm 6 carries control arm pin 14 which, as described below, engages gear 16 or 17. It is apparent that when there are no documents being fed, it requires very little torque to drive roll 2 and spring 8 is not extended by movement of arm 6 as pin 12 drives against it. It is equally apparent that as documents feed between the rolls, the drag on restraint roll...